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      Surfcaster's 2016 Reboot!   09/21/2016

      Howdy, folks. I know this is way overdue, and the damage is probably already done, but after weeks of working with the database I've finally wiped out all of the spam posts and topics. This was no easy task, considering there were three-quarters of a million bogus posts and nearly three hundred thousand bogus topics. Once a hacker/spammer network finds a vulnerability, they send out automated programs that basically destroy a database like this. Over the past couple weeks I've migrated all of the good data into a more current, secure platform with the hopes that we can somehow rebuild. New member registration is tightened way up, and a third-party spam monitoring service is in place. I've also invested in an awesome new gallery extension,  allowing members to create, manage, and share image galleries. Please give it a try, and let me know if there are any issues. I'm still testing and working out the bugs. Surfcaster's forums were once an amazing resource for everyone to enjoy, and we're hoping it can once again build back up. The main site (non-forums) is pretty banged up, but once the forums are complete my next task is to re-invent that as well. Spread the word. Hope to see a lot of you back! Cheers, Andrew
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Guest ridler72

He was real lucky

9 posts in this topic

While I was fishing today I met another fellow who was new to kayak fishing from another site. He had a 12' Pungo Sit in or Sink kayak. He paddled up to me and said he was Spanky from 247. He paddled out to an area way out off a bar and it was his first time out in a kayak. Jeans and T shirt, no skirt, no pump, and no communication in an area that had decent swells. He snagged the bottom with a heavy 3 oz tube and tried to get it back. He flipped in deep water. He had to swim a distance in 50-52 degree water in jeans and a t shirt to get to the shore. At this time I was already off the water as a T-storm was approaching from the west. Acaffrey heard cries for help and he was able to get to him. His kayak was barely floating full of water and heavy. I credit Acaffrey for towing his kayak all the way back. When Spanky came walking over to me he said what had happend. He helped me get my kayak back down to the water and I went to help Acaffrey bring it in. Man was it heavy. We tried to dump water out but it was tough and threatned to flip me in my kayak. We towed it back and got off the water before the T storm hit with heavy wind and rain. Thank god nobody got hurt.

Spanky was real lucky. I still cant believe he made that swim in that cold water.

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BRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

My balls disappeared and I shrunk up like an acorn just thinking about it.

I hope he at least had enough sense to have a pfd on. It sounds like he would have lost his yak if it wasn't for some help. Did he lose his gear?

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Lucky you guys were around to help! Be safe and smart out there everyone. Some risk is involved with most sports but the key is to be aware and be prepared for the conditions. A sik yakker this time of year in the open ocean must have skirt, bilge pump, paddle float, dry gear, and practice in doing wet entries. SOT yakkers too need to be dry and be able to reenter at sea.

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He lost a couple of rods and some gear. Probally still on the bar. He had his pfd on.

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I'm glad everyone made it out safe.

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I have fly fished for 15 years in big moving fresh water from a small but stable canoe with care and without incident. When the salt finally beckoned, my first experiences were on Quonnie pond from the same canoe - no problem. I first experimented with a Yak out front in Late August when the water was 72 and I was in neoprene. The yak was the family Keowee Sink play-around boat. While surfing I got caught in a good breaker and after an awsome ride it filled up. Since I was just playing playing around with it I had stayed in a shallow area and was able to drag the thing to shore. It was unbelievably heavy - water weighs 8 lbs per gallon, after all. How many gallons does even a little Sink hold? I didn't need any further proof. The next day I started looking for a SOT.

If you swamp a Sink you're dead in the water - can't move. In deep water, swells near structure, etc. you could be in real trouble. Unless you are real good at the eskimo roll (read expert kayaker), have a skirt etc. you don't belong anywhere near heavy water in a Sink. Way too big a risk - especially in cold water, but even in warm. The problem of storing and securing fishing gear to a Sink is an issue too. I'm not sure how easy it would be to roll a yak with all the fishing accessories stuck to it - probably way harder than without. Still a relative novice Yak fisher myself, IMHO Yak fishers are probably most a risk during the learning curve. I hope most are smart enough not to make the same mistakes that guy did. He is one very lucky dude. My $.02.

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I'm glad he is ok.

Some food for thought:

Most recreational sinks are too wide to do an eskimo roll easily. Add some gear on deck & it gets harder. Ever stick your fishing rod in the water & try to move it quickly? Multiply that by the number of rods you carry.

No recreation type sik's that I'm aware of come with proper floatation, meaning floatation bags. When I purchased my last sink, they weren't even mentioned. I did buy a skirt, but that shouldn't be a replacement for anything that will displace water. I've read some people use a large dry bag & leave air in when they seal it, empty bleach bottles, pool noodles or anything that will trap some air and or displace water. A sealed bulkhead would be a plus, if it's really sealed, I had a leaky one.

There's also an issue of securing your floatation inside the yak. Do whatever it takes. I had a vertical piece of foam towards the bow of my sink. I'm not sure how secure it was, but it might have worked. If not, I would thru bolt anything that I could tie my flotation to.

With the yak swampings happening lately, I'm thinking of adding some flotation to my sot. Until recently, I never gave it much thought. How many of us sot'ers carry a pump or use extra flotation, just in case we get caught with a hatch not closed properly? I'm guilty, but I think that needs to change.

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A local guy here in central NH with a scanner picked up a message about 2 yakkers in the water and introuble off Ogunquit yesterday. Rescue had been called in. Anyon heard about that incident?

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This time of year the weather's way the hell too changeable for beginners to mess with, as even a quick listen to NOAA or the weather channel makes clear.

This guy's lucky to be alive. He needs some very basic training before venturing out again.

And this is a good place for me to bring up something that nobody seems to talk about. When I learned to sea kayak (a 6 week course at a Charles River boathouse in the late 1980's, in those old rotomolded Sea Runners) the instructor repeatedly told us that you never, as in never, ever, take a kayak out in the ocean alone. You need to use the buddy system, he said.

Made a lot of sense to me. But I see people all the time, not especially fishermen but including some fishermen, out there on their own. And I think this isn't a great idea.

If you go on the water with the notion that somebody else will save your bacon if/when you need it, then I respectfully suggest that you're giving a lot of those other boaters out there a lot more credit than they deserve. Anyone who spends more than a couple of seasons along this coast will learn to be very skeptical about the competencies of other skippers-- except of course the commercial guys, who know what they're doing because their livelihood depends on it. Add to that the fact that a kayak is pretty inconspicuous, and it's easy to see how you could drown within sight of a whole flotilla of weekend warriors.

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